Mismatched Feet

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This entire web site is copyright protected.  1996-2001 Geronimo & Mary Bayard,  2001-2008 Mary Bayard Fitzpatrick
All rights reserved.  Contact Mary for reproduction information & permission.

Q: I have just been introduced to your Q&A website and I hope have read everything available regarding "underslung heels, egg bar shoes, wedge pads, etc." The one question I couldn't find an answer to was "If you have a horse with two different front feet (one with heel and the other without) and the foot with no or very little heel and long toe should require an egg bar, is it necessary that the other foot also require an egg bar for proper balance.
    Have not had much success regarding this question with the local farriers.
    I was delighted to have found your website and have found it to be one of most easily understood and most informative sites regarding shoeing problems and solutions.
     I hope you might find a little time to answer this.  Thanking you in advance. 

A: Thank you very much for the kind words about the web site. The pats on the back are what really make it worthwhile to spend the time doing it.

How could I not answer your question when you ask it so nicely and have already done your homework by doing the reading?

The short answer is no. You do not have to shoe both feet of a pair with the same type of shoe.

To get the horse moving in a balanced way with an even stride it may be necessary to use two different types of shoes on a pair of feet. In the situation you described, the foot with the low heel might best be shod in an egg bar or even dropped down egg bar shoe, probably with the toe squared or rocked. The steeper foot with heel can probably be shod with a plain flat shoe. If the plain shoe is of thicker stock it will help balance out the extra weight of the egg bar shoe. Since lower angles tend to cause more action as do heavier shoes you can help the horse move evenly on both sides by changing the weight of the plain shoe.

If the horse is not in work you probably wouldn't need to worry about increasing the weight of the plain shoe.

Sometimes an egg bar shoe or shoe with swelled heels will be used to ease strain on an injured or bowed tendon. The other foot can be shod normally.

Thank you for your question. I am sure it will be of interest to many readers.

Sincerely,

Mrs. Mary Bayard
 
Dodge Creek Stables
The American Blacksmith
Oakland, Oregon 
 
www.americanblacksmith.com
mary@americanblacksmith.com

 

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This entire web site is copyright protected.  1996-2001 Geronimo & Mary Bayard,  2001-2008 Mary Fitzpatrick
All rights reserved. Contact Mary for reproduction information & permission.